A Vacation from My Mind

A few months ago, I went on vacation. Or at least, I thought I did. I wasn’t at work, I didn’t have a set schedule, and I was sleeping in (well, as much as I could). But did I feel on vacation? From what I understand about vacations, it didn’t really line up.

On vacations, you’re not supposed to be stressed out. You’re not supposed to be worried about things, back home or otherwise. Vacation is a break from all of that.

But I was stressed, anxious and yes – depressed. Though I still had an incredible time on my vacation and enjoyed myself immensely, I didn’t have a break from one thing that I had really hoped I could take a break from – my mind.

Imagine being trapped somewhere you don’t like. No, I won’t paint this imaginary place as the worst place on Earth. But let’s say you don’t like it very much and would rather be elsewhere. Now it’s easy enough to get up and leave – in fact, that would be my first piece of advice to you. But what do you do if you can’t?

If you have a mental illness, you’re all too familiar with this imaginary place. It means different things for different people but for me, it’s my head. There are days – plenty of days – where I wish I could take a vacation from the thoughts in my head. The song “Migraine” by Twenty One Pilots is something I think of often when I can’t take that vacation: am I the only one I know, waging my wars behind my face and above my throat (I really like Twenty One Pilots. I’ll have to write about them one day!).

How do I combat it? I choose to stay busy. Whether it’s working on this blog or doing some other type of work, writing keeps me very busy and my mind very active. So I do that a lot (arguably too much, but that’s another story). When I’m not busy is when things can become frustrating and often, quite sad. I mean actual sad, not pathetic sad. I long to one day take a vacation from the negative self-talk, and constant anxiety, but I also know that I am fortunate in that I know how to fight against this – though it took years to learn.

If you’re like me and can’t really take a vacation from the thoughts in your head, don’t worry, you definitely aren’t alone. If you can do that, let me know what it’s like, because I’m curious about the experience!

_We are only as blind as we want to be._.png

World Mental Health Day 2018

I know I usually post on Thursdays, but I thought I’d mix it up a little this week since today is World Mental Health Day, and what kind of mental health blogger would I be if I didn’t write about that? In addition to World Mental Health Day, this week is also Mental Illness Awareness Week, which is put on by the National Alliance of Mental Illness. These days are not only important for those struggling with their mental health but their loved ones as well.

World Mental Health day 2018

It’s okay not to be okay. #SameHere. Cure Stigma. There are so many mental health movements going on around the country, but they all have a similar goal: reduce the stigma around mental health and make sure people know that they aren’t alone. This might seem like a difficult task, but it is possible.

However, this can’t be done overnight (if only it were that simple!). This is a battle that we have to fight every single day if we want to continue the living the lives we’ve created for ourselves. I talk about mental health and promote mental wellness on this blog not because I think it’s a fun thing to do every now and then, but because it’s a necessity for me to live a healthy life. If I don’t focus on mental health every day, my life as I know it will change.

The theme of this year’s World Mental Health Day is ‘Young people and mental health in a changing world’ and it could not be more relevant in today’s world. According to the World Health Organization, half of mental illnesses begin by the age of 14. They also say that ‘prevention begins with better understanding’ which I totally agree with. That means talking to young people, sometimes children, about how they’re feeling and trying to understand what it is. Sometimes it’ll be nothing. Other times it will be something that could turn their mental health around! You won’t know unless you ask those questions.

But they’re just kids, critics will say. They’re always in a ‘mood’ or are going through something. Are they? Yes, every person goes through ups and down – that’s life. But take it from someone who knows. It’s not normal to dislike yourself. It’s not normal to have constant crying spells. It’s not normal to not feel like yourself most of the time.

Like I’ve said plenty of times on this blog, mental illness does not discriminate. It doesn’t matter your gender, your race, your religion, – or even your age – mental illness can happen to anyone. Promoting healthy minds can lead to healthy lives, and it starts as early as you want it to start. So this World Mental Health Day, maybe check in with a young person and see how they’re doing. See where they’re at with their mental health. It can’t hurt, right?

You may have to fight a battle more than once.png

Q&A With Dr. Laura Dabney

This week we’re talking with a mental health PRO! Dr. Laura F. Dabny, M.D. is a psychiatrist who has run her own psychotherapy practice in Virginia Beach for nearly 20 years. She was kind enough to answer some of my questions about mental health and its place in today’s society.

What is a popular misconception about seeing a psychiatrist?
That we are judgmental, critical or going to tell a patient what to do. Instead, we are impartial, supportive and help you find the best solution for your problems.

When should someone consider getting help for their mental health issues?
I define that by when your problem, however “big” or “small,” negatively impacts your relationships or job performance, it’s time to get help.

How, especially in the beginning, can a person learn to trust a professional with their mental health? 
By reading my last answer a few times! Just kidding. There’s nothing wrong with calling and asking to speak to the mental health person before making the appointment.
Reputable and trustworthy professionals will be glad to do this. It may help to see if you “click” over the phone before going in. I also strongly recommend that if you get a bad vibe for any reason in the first appointment, don’t make a follow-up appointment. An initial evaluation is a way to test your connection with the therapist. It doesn’t commit you in any way.

What advice would you give to someone who is looking to get help for their mental health?
Break the concept of “getting help” into bite-size chunks. You don’t have to throw yourself into months of therapy. Start first by simply checking out some websites or some blogs on mental health. Then maybe just call and talk to the receptionist about the practice. These casual first steps might help get you over the nervousness about making an appointment.

What is the best way to address possible stigmas of mental health?
Luckily this seems to be improving. I think reading books by accomplished people with mental illness such as Kay Jamison’s book (Unquiet Mind) helps balance the media’s skewed perception that people with mental illness are untreatable or misfits.

Anything you’d like to add?
Although I’m an M. D., I do believe in using psychotherapy to help ween people off psychotropic medications. Big Pharma really pushed these medications as miracle drugs in the ’90s when I was in training. While they can be helpful, there are many people that can benefit from therapy or short-term use of medication, and therefore don’t need the medications for life. It’s important to get a second opinion if someone recommends medication without giving a list of pros and cons of the different types of therapy and medication usage.