Reading and Mental Health

As a kid, I loved to read. While I had favorite authors and genres, it came to a point where it almost didn’t matter what kind of book it was – if I hadn’t read it before, odds were that I’d give it a shot. I’d guess that I’ve read hundreds of books in my lifetime, but the vast majority of them happened before I went to college – and I had to deal with my mental health.

When my mental health worsened, it became hard to read. I had difficulty concentrating on one task at a time, and the result was many years of multitasking. I would have music on while studying, or stream a show on Netflix while doing some writing. I could not focus on a sole subject or interest because I could not develop a one-track mind. Instead, I would have two thought processes running in my head: 1) the normal thoughts and feelings about what it is I was doing at the time, and 2) the negative thoughts and self-talk that seemed to be popping up more and more every day.

By multitasking, I was occupying both thought processes and keeping my mind fully occupied and away from the negative thoughts. But reading a book meant that I would have to develop a one-track mind that concentrated on the words on the page – a near-impossible ask for my anxious self.

This meant that over the course of my college career, I read very little outside of what was required for school. After college, I tried to get into reading a little more, but it proved to be too difficult. I thought that I had to be busy all the time in order to combat the negative thoughts, and the result was an unhealthy lifestyle that definitely didn’t make me feel better about myself. So, like in many other aspects of my mental health and my life, I took a new approach.

First I started rereading books that I’d enjoyed in the past. Some were easier to read than others, but it helped me get on a good schedule of reading consistently because even if I didn’t enjoy it, I’d already read the book before so it wasn’t a total waste.

When 2019 started, I decided to take a chance and really get into reading again. I started by making it a goal to read only 10 pages a day. It was a small chunk, but it was manageable and made me feel like I’d accomplished something. Soon, I started reading during my lunch break at work, which satiated my need for multitasking while helping me learn how to focus on reading.

It’s taken a few months, but I’ve finally hit my groove. I’ve read four books so far in 2019 and I just started my fifth, and while I’m not in love with reading like I used to be as a kid, I like it a whole lot more than I have in recent years. I hope that as my mental muscles grow stronger I can read not only as a coping mechanism but because I genuinely enjoy it.

Has your mental health affected a hobby or activity that you love? Let me know in the comments!

5 thoughts on “Reading and Mental Health

  1. mcwilsonky March 26, 2019 / 10:01 am

    Your post is just like what happened to me! I read hundreds of books before joining the military. After, my reading slowed to almost none. I too have trouble with concentration and long ago gave up trying to do one thing at a time. It just isn’t something I ever really have done, so I find it really difficult. Thank you for sharing how you are coping with this, I think I will try it your way!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. ashleyleia March 26, 2019 / 11:30 am

    I was able to get back into reading when I started doing book reviews for my blog. It gave me more motivation to read, plus taking notes as I was reading really helped with retaining what I’d read rather than immediately forgetting it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Nathan Smith March 26, 2019 / 12:19 pm

      That’s such a good idea! I have not taken notes on anything I’ve read since I was in school, but you’re right it would totally change up the way I read!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Dana Williams March 26, 2019 / 9:50 pm

    ❤️

    Like

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